Jaguar by Kyle Exhibition Print

Sale price Price £10.00 Regular price

Jaguar Print 2019 | Where Did All the Animals Go? Exhibition

High quality A4 print beautifully reproduced from original colour Biro drawing. This print is being sold in support of Born Free Foundation

DETAILS

  • Edition: Open edition
  • Artist: Kyle, Bexhill Academy, Sunderland
  • Printed on 230gsm matte archival paper
  • Size: 30 x 21cm
  • Print signed and numbered by Jane Lee McCracken with dedication to artist
  • Profits from each print sale go directly to Born Free

 

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Jaguar

This soulful drawing of a jaguar exhibited in Where Did All the Animals Go? exhibition is accompanied by the following information:

Conservation Status: NEAR THREATENED

Population: 15,000 

BIOLOGY

The jaguar is the largest cat of the Americas and a formidable predator

Its common name comes from the native name ‘yaguara’, meaning ‘a beast that kills its prey with one bound’. It has a muscular build and strong jaws. This remarkable cat possesses a visually striking coat of large black rosettes, mostly enclosing dark spots, set against golden brown to yellow fur. Melanistic forms are also relatively common, often called ‘black panthers’ in the Americas.

Jaguars vary considerably in size in different regions, but genetic studies indicate that there are no subspecies. Jaguars found in the dense forested areas of the Amazon Basin are generally smaller and darker in colour than those found in more open terrain. Jaguars are solitary animals. The female gives birth to a litter size of one to four cubs. Young are dependent on their mother for up to two years. Life span in the wild is not known, but jaguar specialist Alan Rabinowitz estimated that few jaguars in Belize lived more than 11 years. Although the jaguar has been characterised as nocturnal, it is more often active around dawn and dusk. Like most cats, jaguars are opportunistic hunters. Relative to their size, they have the most powerful bite of the ‘big cats’ and are the only big cat to regularly kill by piercing the skull.

THREATS

Prolifically hunted for its pelt in the 60s and 70s, this practice has declined as a result of anti-fur campaigns although hunting by cattle ranchers is an ongoing problem. Primary threats today come from habitat loss through deforestation, which is having a drastic impact on the jaguar’s prey base. Information credit: Arkive

 

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE

'Where Did All the Animals Go?' An Exhibition of North East School Children’s Biro Drawings Working with Artist, Jane Lee McCracken featuring Biro drawings of some of the world’s most endangered species, at Thought Foundation Art Gallery 20 June - 22 July 2019. Jane worked with over 400 children visiting five schools across the region to deliver Biro drawing workshops. Both exhibition and the Endangered Species Conference, also organised by Jane, are supported by international wildlife charity Born Free, with President and Co-Founder Will Travers, OBE headlining the conference. Included in the exhibition is a selection of Jane’s Biro drawings, which explore loss to the environment, generated by human destruction.

Both exhibition and conference call for wider awareness and compassion for wildlife affected by human destruction, and the subsequent impact of wildlife depletion on humanity if we don’t act now. These events, which also include workshops and film screenings during the exhibition, reveal the facts as to why and how species are threatened and provide access to vital knowledge as well as concise, key actions each one of us can take, so we can make positive changes for wildlife, both locally and globally.

More information about this project here:

janeleemccracken.co.uk/blogs/where-did-all-the-animals-go