Lynx by Leonardo Exhibition Print

Sale price Price £10.00 Regular price

Iberian Lynx Print 2019 | Where Did All the Animals Go? Exhibition

High quality A4 print beautifully reproduced from original colour Biro drawing. This print is being sold in support of Born Free Foundation

DETAILS

  • Edition: Open edition
  • Artist: Leonardo, St Mary Magdalen RCVA Primary School, Seaham
  • Printed on 230gsm matte archival paper
  • Size: 30 x 21cm
  • Print signed and numbered by Jane Lee McCracken with dedication to artist
  • Profits from each print sale go directly to Born Free

 

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Iberian Lynx

This excellent drawing of an Iberian Lynx exhibited in Where Did All the Animals Go? exhibition is accompanied by the following information:

Conservation Status: ENDANGERED

Population: 156

BIOLOGY

Iberian Lynx are one of the most endangered wild cats on earth

Iberian Lynx are only about half the size of the Eurasian lynx. They are found only in two small areas of southwest Spain on the Iberian Peninsula, west of the Pyrenees mountains. Despite extensive surveys, they have not been detected in Portugal since the 1990’s. Closely related to the Eurasian Lynx, their ranges used to meet at the Spanish-French border along the Pyrenees Mountains. More recently, the range of the Iberian Lynx has significantly contracted, and now consists of a series of small islands of suitable natural habitat, such as national parks and reserves.

THREATS

Between 1985 and 2001, their range declined by 87%. By 2010, they existed in two small populations: 70-80 cats in the south of Andalusia and 170-180 individuals in the Sierra Morena (2010). Their numbers were decimated by rapid habitat loss. Human development such as dams, highways and railways also encroached on their native habitat. While losing their habitat, humans were also over-hunting the cats main prey species, the European rabbit. In 2001, when the Iberian lynx population was less than 100 animals, the Life Lince conservation project was launched. A captive breeding program was part of the project, and by 2009 their efforts had increased the number of captive Iberian lynx from zero to 78 (2010). There are now four breeding centres in Spain and Portugal. The second aim of the project was working in the field, restoring habitat and increasing rabbit numbers with a view towards reintroduction, and the first lynx from the captive breeding project were reintroduced into a new area in Andalusia in 2009. Information credit: Wild Cat Conservation

 

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE

'Where Did All the Animals Go?' An Exhibition of North East School Children’s Biro Drawings Working with Artist, Jane Lee McCracken featuring Biro drawings of some of the world’s most endangered species, at Thought Foundation Art Gallery 20 June - 22 July 2019. Jane worked with over 400 children visiting five schools across the region to deliver Biro drawing workshops. Both exhibition and the Endangered Species Conference, also organised by Jane, are supported by international wildlife charity Born Free, with President and Co-Founder Will Travers, OBE headlining the conference. Included in the exhibition is a selection of Jane’s Biro drawings, which explore loss to the environment, generated by human destruction.

Both exhibition and conference call for wider awareness and compassion for wildlife affected by human destruction, and the subsequent impact of wildlife depletion on humanity if we don’t act now. These events, which also include workshops and film screenings during the exhibition, reveal the facts as to why and how species are threatened and provide access to vital knowledge as well as concise, key actions each one of us can take, so we can make positive changes for wildlife, both locally and globally.

More information about this project here:

janeleemccracken.co.uk/blogs/where-did-all-the-animals-go