Tarsier by Callum Exhibition Print

Sale price Price £10.00 Regular price

Horsfield's Tarsier Print 2019 | Where Did All the Animals Go? Exhibition

High quality A4 print beautifully reproduced from original colour Biro drawing. This print is being sold in support of Born Free Foundation

DETAILS

  • Edition: Open edition
  • Artist: Callum, Yr 6 Royal Grammar School, Newcastle
  • Printed on 230gsm matte archival paper
  • Size: 30 x 21cm
  • Print signed and numbered by Jane Lee McCracken with dedication to artist
  • Profits from each print sale go directly to Born Free

 

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HORSFIELD'S TARSIER

This exceptional drawing of a Horsfield's tarsier exhibited in Where Did All the Animals Go? exhibition is accompanied by the following information:

Conservation Status: VULNERABLE

Population: 29,440

BIOLOGY

Horsfield tarsiers have extraordinarily large golden eyes

Also known as the western tarsier, it is native to Southeast Asia including Borneo, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Tarsiers reside in a wide variety of habitats and Horsfield’s tarsier seems to prefer the edge of secondary forests. They live to 15 years in the wild. Alongside their large eyes they have thin, almost translucent, scalloped ears. Horsfield’s tarsiers have short forelimbs and greatly elongated hind limbs that allow them to jump up to 16.5 ft (5 m), about 40 times their body length, between branches.

Long, thin skeletal-looking fingers and toes are fitted with large pads at the tips that allow tarsiers to tightly grab branches and prey. Fingernails and toenails are flattened, except for the second and third toe digits, which function as grooming claws used to remove dead skin and parasites.

These nocturnal primates patiently wait for prey to approach. Tarsiers have keen hearing and locate their prey primarily by sound. Their ability to rotate their head 180 degrees in each direction allows them to easily spy, and then ambush, potential dinner victims. From a fixed position, Horsfield’s tarsiers can reach out and grab a bird or bat, sometimes mid-flight; or they might choose to leap upon their intended target.

THREATS

Habitat loss is the primary threat facing Horsfield’s tarsier. Although they tolerate a measure of habitat disturbance and do well in secondary habitats, Horsfield’s tarsiers do not migrate over long distances. Deforestation, therefore, poses a seriously adverse effect on the population. The species also suffers from the toxic effects of agricultural pesticides. Horsfield’s tarsier is threatened by the illegal pet trade, usually dying within days of capture. Information credit: New England Primate Conservancy

 

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE

'Where Did All the Animals Go?' An Exhibition of North East School Children’s Biro Drawings Working with Artist, Jane Lee McCracken featuring Biro drawings of some of the world’s most endangered species, at Thought Foundation Art Gallery 20 June - 22 July 2019. Jane worked with over 400 children visiting five schools across the region to deliver Biro drawing workshops. Both exhibition and the Endangered Species Conference, also organised by Jane, are supported by international wildlife charity Born Free, with President and Co-Founder Will Travers, OBE headlining the conference. Included in the exhibition is a selection of Jane’s Biro drawings, which explore loss to the environment, generated by human destruction.

Both exhibition and conference call for wider awareness and compassion for wildlife affected by human destruction, and the subsequent impact of wildlife depletion on humanity if we don’t act now. These events, which also include workshops and film screenings during the exhibition, reveal the facts as to why and how species are threatened and provide access to vital knowledge as well as concise, key actions each one of us can take, so we can make positive changes for wildlife, both locally and globally.

More information about this project here:

janeleemccracken.co.uk/blogs/where-did-all-the-animals-go