Panda by Euan Exhibition Print

Sale price Price £10.00 Regular price

Giant Panda Print 2019 | Where Did All the Animals Go? Exhibition

High quality A4 print beautifully reproduced from original colour Biro drawing. This print is being sold in support of Born Free Foundation

DETAILS

  • Edition: Open edition
  • Artist: Euan, Yr 6 Royal Grammar School, Newcastle
  • Printed on 230gsm matte archival paper
  • Size: 30 x 21cm
  • Print signed and numbered by Jane Lee McCracken with dedication to artist
  • Profits from each print sale go directly to Born Free

 

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GIANT PANDA

This fluid and expressive drawing of a giant panda exhibited in Where Did All the Animals Go? exhibition is accompanied by the following information:

Conservation Status: VULNERABLE

Population: 500 - 1000

BIOLOGY

Giant Pandas have evolved to specialize on a diet of bamboo

Bamboo is a poor food source, low in protein thus, to meet their daily energy requirement, giant pandas must consume a large amount of bamboo. Pandas have large, muscular jaws, with its famous “pseudothumb” which is used to hold and manipulate bamboo for processing. However, compared with other herbivores, the panda has very low digestive efficiency because its digestive tract still resembles that of its carnivorous ancestors.

The panda’s feeding strategy emphasizes volume, requiring it to allocate much of its time to foraging. While morphological and behavioural adaptations provide some compensation for poor digestive efficiency, the Panda’s ability to survive on such a low-quality food source remained mysterious for decades. Dietary specialization is often seen as an extinction risk factor, but this may not be the case for the Panda, which specializes on widespread and abundant bamboo. Thus, pandas are well-adapted to their environment and have reproductive rates sufficiently high to explain the recovery of populations once bans on poaching and habitat restoration efforts commenced.

THREATS

Habitat loss and fragmentation remain the gravest threats to the survival of the species. A large proportion of the panda's habitat has already been lost: logged for timber and fuel wood, or cleared for agriculture and infrastructure to meet the needs of the area's booming population. Rapidly increasing number of tourists in the forests is causing significant disturbance to pandas and their habitats. Some poaching of pandas still occurs. Hunting the animals for their fur has declined due to strict laws and greater public awareness of the panda’s protected status.

Information credit: IUCN Red List

 

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE

'Where Did All the Animals Go?' An Exhibition of North East School Children’s Biro Drawings Working with Artist, Jane Lee McCracken featuring Biro drawings of some of the world’s most endangered species, at Thought Foundation Art Gallery 20 June - 22 July 2019. Jane worked with over 400 children visiting five schools across the region to deliver Biro drawing workshops. Both exhibition and the Endangered Species Conference, also organised by Jane, are supported by international wildlife charity Born Free, with President and Co-Founder Will Travers, OBE headlining the conference. Included in the exhibition is a selection of Jane’s Biro drawings, which explore loss to the environment, generated by human destruction.

Both exhibition and conference call for wider awareness and compassion for wildlife affected by human destruction, and the subsequent impact of wildlife depletion on humanity if we don’t act now. These events, which also include workshops and film screenings during the exhibition, reveal the facts as to why and how species are threatened and provide access to vital knowledge as well as concise, key actions each one of us can take, so we can make positive changes for wildlife, both locally and globally.

More information about this project here:

janeleemccracken.co.uk/blogs/where-did-all-the-animals-go