Dingo by Leon Exhibition Print

Sale price Price £10.00 Regular price

Dingo Print 2019 | Where Did All the Animals Go? Exhibition

High quality A4 print beautifully reproduced from original colour Biro drawing. This print is being sold in support of Born Free Foundation

DETAILS

  • Edition: Open edition
  • Artist: Leon, Mortimer Primary School, South Shields
  • Printed on 230gsm matte archival paper
  • Size: 30 x 21cm
  • Print signed and numbered by Jane Lee McCracken with dedication to artist
  • Profits from each print sale go directly to Born Free

 

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Dingo

This accomplished drawing of a Dingo exhibited in Where Did All the Animals Go? exhibition is accompanied by the following information:

Conservation Status: VULNERABLE

Population: UNKNOWN 

BIOLOGY

The dingo is legendary as Australia's wild dog

The Australian animals may be descendants of Asian dingoes that were introduced to the continent some 3,000 to 4,000 years ago. These golden canids live alone or in packs of up to ten animals. They roam great distances and communicate with wolf-like howls. Dingo hunting is opportunistic. Animals hunt alone or in cooperative packs. They pursue small game such as rabbits, rodents, birds, and lizards. These dogs will eat fruits and plants as well. They also scavenge from humans, particularly in their Asian range. Dingoes breed only once a year. Females typically give birth to about five pups, which are not independent until six to eight months of age. In packs, a dominant breeding female will kill the offspring of other females.

THREATS

Cross-breeding with domestic dogs represents a significant threat to the long-term persistence of dingoes. Hybrids exist in all populations worldwide and the proportion of hybrids is increasing. Hunting for dingo skin and scalps exist in some regions of Australia. Dingoes are also sold in human food markets in several Asian countries. They are also bred by private individuals and companies in Australia and USA and sold as pets. Information credit: National Geographic

 

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE

'Where Did All the Animals Go?' An Exhibition of North East School Children’s Biro Drawings Working with Artist, Jane Lee McCracken featuring Biro drawings of some of the world’s most endangered species, at Thought Foundation Art Gallery 20 June - 22 July 2019. Jane worked with over 400 children visiting five schools across the region to deliver Biro drawing workshops. Both exhibition and the Endangered Species Conference, also organised by Jane, are supported by international wildlife charity Born Free, with President and Co-Founder Will Travers, OBE headlining the conference. Included in the exhibition is a selection of Jane’s Biro drawings, which explore loss to the environment, generated by human destruction.

Both exhibition and conference call for wider awareness and compassion for wildlife affected by human destruction, and the subsequent impact of wildlife depletion on humanity if we don’t act now. These events, which also include workshops and film screenings during the exhibition, reveal the facts as to why and how species are threatened and provide access to vital knowledge as well as concise, key actions each one of us can take, so we can make positive changes for wildlife, both locally and globally.

More information about this project here:

janeleemccracken.co.uk/blogs/where-did-all-the-animals-go