'RHINO', 2014 DETAIL OF BIRO DRAWING

'RHINO', 2014 DETAIL OF BIRO DRAWING

INSPIRATION AND SYMBOLISM

Elephant Calf (Rhino back)
Depicting one of the most moving sequences from ‘Africa’ this drawing portrays the moment a starving elephant calf, too weak to hold up its head, collapses into the drought-ridden grass. This drawing symbolises that elephants endure natural adversities as well as poaching for their tusks.

Mother Elephant
Layered above the dying calf is a drawing of its mother weeping over the death of her calf. Having stood vigil and tried to revive the calf, she accepts its death. Elephants are the only known species apart from humans to practice ritual behaviour when confronting death, including
grief and have been known to show the same emotions when encountering
human death.

Adult Elephant
Layered through the dying calf is an image of a triumphant adult elephant drinking from a water hole, celebrating the monumental greatness of the largest land mammal on earth, surrounded by the slight stature of gazelles and zebra. The elephant cluster within the drawing also symbolises the natural cycle of life and death amongst all species.

Dead Elephant Calf and Mother Elephant
A tiny drawing through the centre of the piece shows the body of the dead calf lying in the dust and the moment the mother elephant senses she has to leave her calf and return to the herd. Left behind to tend the sick calf the herd are bound to continue their quest to find water and avoid further death. As she turns and walks away a faded image of another adult elephant beyond her indicates that she eventually reaches the herd.

South China Tigers - Mother, cubs & Male
(back & front Rhino legs)
When Jane began drawing ‘Rhino’ in early summer 2014 the official number of wild tigers was less than 3500. By August the official number reported less than 3200 wild tigers. There are more tigers in captivity than in the wild. The small tiger cubs represent the future of tigers walking towards extinction, but ‘hope’ that it is possible not only to save wild tigers but all the species depicted in ‘Rhino’.

Great White Sharks (layered through rhino body)
Illustrating the grace of an enigmatic animal that has inhabited the earth for 500million years. Featuring a great white shark with as sunlight flickers over its body, encourages appreciation of the beauty and necessity of sharks in a bid to dispel the negative populist image. Shark finning for shark fin soup is rapidly depleting shark species populations; eleven species are endangered.
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'RHINO', 2014 DETAIL OF BIRO DRAWING

'RHINO', 2014 DETAIL OF BIRO DRAWING

INSPIRATION AND SYMBOLISM

Elephant Calf (Rhino back)
Depicting one of the most moving sequences from ‘Africa’ this drawing portrays the moment a starving elephant calf, too weak to hold up its head, collapses into the drought-ridden grass. This drawing symbolises that elephants endure natural adversities as well as poaching for their tusks.

Mother Elephant
Layered above the dying calf is a drawing of its mother weeping over the death of her calf. Having stood vigil and tried to revive the calf, she accepts its death. Elephants are the only known species apart from humans to practice ritual behaviour when confronting death, including
grief and have been known to show the same emotions when encountering
human death.

Adult Elephant
Layered through the dying calf is an image of a triumphant adult elephant drinking from a water hole, celebrating the monumental greatness of the largest land mammal on earth, surrounded by the slight stature of gazelles and zebra. The elephant cluster within the drawing also symbolises the natural cycle of life and death amongst all species.

Dead Elephant Calf and Mother Elephant
A tiny drawing through the centre of the piece shows the body of the dead calf lying in the dust and the moment the mother elephant senses she has to leave her calf and return to the herd. Left behind to tend the sick calf the herd are bound to continue their quest to find water and avoid further death. As she turns and walks away a faded image of another adult elephant beyond her indicates that she eventually reaches the herd.

South China Tigers - Mother, cubs & Male
(back & front Rhino legs)
When Jane began drawing ‘Rhino’ in early summer 2014 the official number of wild tigers was less than 3500. By August the official number reported less than 3200 wild tigers. There are more tigers in captivity than in the wild. The small tiger cubs represent the future of tigers walking towards extinction, but ‘hope’ that it is possible not only to save wild tigers but all the species depicted in ‘Rhino’.

Great White Sharks (layered through rhino body)
Illustrating the grace of an enigmatic animal that has inhabited the earth for 500million years. Featuring a great white shark with as sunlight flickers over its body, encourages appreciation of the beauty and necessity of sharks in a bid to dispel the negative populist image. Shark finning for shark fin soup is rapidly depleting shark species populations; eleven species are endangered.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: