'Cherry Blossom Girl', colour Biro drawing on found Oriental Fan

'Cherry Blossom Girl', colour Biro drawing on found Oriental Fan

Using a found hand fan as a drawing surface to present the epilogue of 'The Legend of the Last South China Tiger', “Cherry Blossom Girl’, Jane suggests the depth of tradition through the iconography of this object. As tiger species struggle to endure the 21st century, locked in a battle with traditional medicine, one of the greatest threats to their survival, this piece symbolises the fact that tiger evolution is even older than tradition and Jane’s belief that tigers should now be placed above tradition in order to preserve them. The fluttering of a hand fan also represents not only the motion of butterfly wings and the old Chinese legend of the ‘Butterfly Lovers’ but also that tigers teeter on the edge of extinction in the wild.

Exclusively made for Save Wild Tigers, 'Cherry Blossom Girl', will be exhibited and auctioned on board the Eastern and Oriental Tiger Express from 2nd - 6th October, 2014 with all proceeds going directly to Save Wild Tigers. The Tiger Express departs Raffles Hotel, Singapore journeying through Malaysia, stopping off at The Majestic Tiger Ball, Kuala Lumpur and completes its journey in Thailand.

“In creating ‘Cherry Blossom Girl”, I wanted to portray ‘hope’ that it is possible to save wild tigers. Saving tigers has been a lifelong passion since I was a small child and learned that the Caspian Tiger had finally been declared extinct. I hope this piece echoes the wondrous sights passengers will absorb during their journey and serve as a memento of an extraordinary experience. It was a challenging piece to make, drawing directly onto a wooden fan with colour Biro, a medium that allows no room for error. But this resonates with the hard work of SWT, a cause dedicated to maintaining the enrichment of our world by allowing us to share it with one of the most beautiful creatures that has ever existed.”
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'Cherry Blossom Girl', colour Biro drawing on found Oriental Fan

'Cherry Blossom Girl', colour Biro drawing on found Oriental Fan

Using a found hand fan as a drawing surface to present the epilogue of 'The Legend of the Last South China Tiger', “Cherry Blossom Girl’, Jane suggests the depth of tradition through the iconography of this object. As tiger species struggle to endure the 21st century, locked in a battle with traditional medicine, one of the greatest threats to their survival, this piece symbolises the fact that tiger evolution is even older than tradition and Jane’s belief that tigers should now be placed above tradition in order to preserve them. The fluttering of a hand fan also represents not only the motion of butterfly wings and the old Chinese legend of the ‘Butterfly Lovers’ but also that tigers teeter on the edge of extinction in the wild.

Exclusively made for Save Wild Tigers, 'Cherry Blossom Girl', will be exhibited and auctioned on board the Eastern and Oriental Tiger Express from 2nd - 6th October, 2014 with all proceeds going directly to Save Wild Tigers. The Tiger Express departs Raffles Hotel, Singapore journeying through Malaysia, stopping off at The Majestic Tiger Ball, Kuala Lumpur and completes its journey in Thailand.

“In creating ‘Cherry Blossom Girl”, I wanted to portray ‘hope’ that it is possible to save wild tigers. Saving tigers has been a lifelong passion since I was a small child and learned that the Caspian Tiger had finally been declared extinct. I hope this piece echoes the wondrous sights passengers will absorb during their journey and serve as a memento of an extraordinary experience. It was a challenging piece to make, drawing directly onto a wooden fan with colour Biro, a medium that allows no room for error. But this resonates with the hard work of SWT, a cause dedicated to maintaining the enrichment of our world by allowing us to share it with one of the most beautiful creatures that has ever existed.”
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: